Sens. Scott, Ernst introduce invoice to present protection to US bases after terrorism at NAS Pensacola

By | March 5, 2020

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Sens. Rick Scott, R-Fla., and Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, launched a invoice Thursday to lower the dangers of practicing foreign nationals on American military bases — a response to the deadly December terrorist attack on Naval Air Region Pensacola.

The invoice, called the “Right U.S. Bases Act,” beefs up vetting of foreign military students while moreover rising a more restricted visa for such students and encourages the military to prepare members of foreign militaries in a foreign country if doubtless.

“The protection and safety of American men and ladies in uniform is repeatedly a priority for me, and it will seemingly be [a] priority of our total authorities,” Scott acknowledged in an announcement asserting the invoice’s introduction. “This terrorist will possess to never possess been allowed in our nation, no longer to shriek on an American military infamous with straightforward rep entry to to American military men and ladies.”

NAS PENSACOLA SHOOTING WAS AN ‘ACT OF TERRORISM’, BARR SAYS; US TO EXPEL 21 SAUDI NATIONALS IN TRAINING PROGRAM

The taking pictures at Naval Air Region Pensacola — in Scott’s home deliver — used to be perpetrated by a member of the Royal Saudi Air Power who used to be practicing in the US with the American military. He killed three sailors earlier than he used to be shot and killed.

It used to be later revealed that the killer used to be “motivated by jihadist ideology,” in conserving with Legal respectable General Bill Barr, and that he posted “anti-American, anti-Israeli and jihadist messages on social media, along with two hours earlier than the attack.”

The U.S. expelled 21 Saudi nationals who possess been concerned with the identical practicing program. Scott has for weeks called for adjustments to the programs that prepare foreign nationals on U.S. military bases.

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“Foreign military programs possess essential advantages—providing our companions at some level of the sector the opportunity to prepare and learn from the particular here in the U.S.,” Ernst acknowledged, “nevertheless the tragic events at Pensacola underscore the unacceptable shortfalls in our safety standards and vetting procedures.”

Ernst on Wednesday chaired a listening to with the Senate Armed Services and products Committee’s Rising Threats Subcommittee on the vetting procedures oldschool for foreign military students.

“It’s miles important that we learn from the attack, discover the threat, and exhaust the crucial steps to be clear the protection of our servicemen and ladies going ahead,” she acknowledged in the listening to.

Fox Files’ Travis Fedschun contributed to this sage.